You, Your Family, and Your Wedding.

Your family's right behind you, all the way. For this bride, literally!

By their nature, most weddings (the exceptions being these excercises in opulent navel gazing and their brethren) are about celebrating the family. Yours, his, and the great big new one that just came together.

But making planning the event a family affair makes a lot of brides break out in hives.  And it’s understandable. There are always enough opinions to go around, and when some of them come from people who drive you a little over the edge to begin with, things can get a little tense.  How can’t however, shut everyone out, particularly if they are helping pay for your big day.  Here are a few ways to integrate the bunch into your plans without going bananas.

  • Supermodel, Work!  Nothing makes female relatives feel more “in” on the process than a trip to the bridal salons to watch you do your best runway walk in gorgeous gowns.  It doesn’t have to be “the” time you plan to buy, or even “the” store you plan to visit.  Make an appointment, and try on a variety of shapes and styles.  Even better, let each woman who’s with you pick a dress for you to try.
  • Scavenger Hunt.  Have you been looking for ¾ inch gold ribbon? Rhinestone swizzle sticks? Is Aunt Sue on your last nerve about how you’re not organized properly? Send her on a treasure hunt for those last items you need that are hard to find, or available only at that one store on the other side of town.  She’ll feel useful, and you’ll get some peace and quiet.
  • Keep the content current on BNN – The Bridal News Network.  There are going to be people who you’re not in touch with daily who’ll want to feel like insiders.  Whether it’s a weekly call to Grandma, or a blog for far-flung sorority sisters, make sure that those who want news get it.

Families go a little haywire when it comes to weddings. But they love you, and are only making you crazy because they want to share this special experience, too. Handle as you do all things you love – with care.

Care well, and love well.




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The Stressed Bride Asks, Do They Make Wedding Centerpieces Out Of Cookies?

Truth be told, you can find a centerpiece made out of anything you want, as these baby shower masterpieces demonstrate.  (personally, I would throttle friends who decorated a party in my honor with poop receptacles).

But as wedding planning progresses, stress can start to get the better of you.  And many of us, when stressed, start munching.  The sticky point is that the very reason brides are stressed, is an event where they want to look their best. Not exactly the time to pick up the family size package of Oreos, is it?

Long before my wedding, I completed the Weight Watchers program to “lifetime” status. After that, WW encourages you to come once a month, and stay on top of your eating habits.  And so when I got engaged, I was within shooting distance of my goal weight. With Weight Watchers’ support, I got to where I wanted to be, and had the support to make sure I stayed there.  They aren’t paying me or anything – this is straight from the heart: If you have some weight to lose, for your wedding or any other reason and want to do it in a healthy way, I highly recommend Weight Watchers.

As for those wedding centerpiece cookies, I’m including this Weight Watchers cookie recipe that, whether you’re on the program or not, is a much better option than diving for the Double Stuffs.  All things in moderation of course, but healthier recipes are a good way to start.

Be well, and love well.


Weight Watchers Caramel Cookies- 1point plus/cookie

½ cup unsalted butter

1 cup packed dark brown sugar

1 large egg

1 tsp vanilla extract

1 Cup flour

¾ Cup flour, whole wheat

¼ tsp table salt

½ tsp baking soda

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.  In a large bowl, using an electric mixer, cream butter, sugar, egg, and vanilla. Add remaining ingredients and beat thoroughly. Scrape dough out of bowl and onto a large piece of plastic wrap. Roll dough into a log, about 2.5 inches wide. Completely wrap dough in plastic and refrigerate until firm, at least 20 minutes or up to overnight.  Cut dough into 1/8 inch slices and arrange on ungreased cookie sheets 1 inch apart. Bake until lightly browned around edges, about 8-10 minutes. Allow cookies to cool on sheet 1 minute, then remove to wire rack to cool.


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